Help, Hope, and Healing for the Samburu

Help, Hope, and Healing for the Samburu

Although perhaps the most remote and desolate place many of the Kenya THP team had ever visited, they were thankful for the opportunity to bring help, hope, and healing to the wonderful Samburu people. The families suffer greatly through a tremendous drought. Families have been forced to leave their homes to take their animals in search of water and food. Many families are separated: some members off with the animals and some staying with the children in their “mañatas” or villages. Although living in such challenging conditions, we were met with smiles, a handshake, and the friendly greeting of “sopa” or hello.

A couple of days after arriving, we helped unload two trucks loaded with beans, corn, rice, and cooking fat. We sorted and prepared the food for distribution. The next morning, mamas arrived with their sacks, and some with donkeys to help carry the food. The Samburu elders of executed the responsibility of dividing out the food among the people. The organization and calmness of the food distribution amazed us. Noone pushed or shoved or argued. In fact, just the opposite occurred. Many helped others. When a group showed up unexpectedly, the people shared what they had so everyone benefitted from this massive food distribution. All in all, approximately 600 families received food sufficient to feed their families for a month. How gratifying and humbling to be part of this project.

The team assembled and installed two sets of soccer goals in two areas of the region. Digging through the hard, dry ground and working in the scorching sun was well worth it when the children came out to see what we were doing. Pumping up a soccer ball and tossing it to them brought ear-to-ear smiles. Around 50 children took off running across that hot soccer field, each one taking his turn at kicking the ball. Previously,  only a couple of wobbly posts served as goals. Something as small as a soccer goal brought joy and happiness and energy and hope to children accustomed to surviving with very little.

We were also blessed to offer some medical assistance. Team member Cameron helped Amanda treat the dozens of patients who drop by her front porch for help. Though that wasn’t our primary focus, it was an extra blessing to aid in bringing healing to these delightful people.

Our team helped finish the small, one-room house constructed for Victoria, the Simmons intern who will arrive in a couple weeks. We installed the windows and doors and did what we could to make it snake proof.

Finally, teammate Randy, a pilot, laid out a landing strip for small aircraft. We located it across the road from the Simmons home. Once this airstrip is cleared and ready, aircraft can fly in supplies and people from the capital city. A trip that now requires 9-10 hours across difficult terrain will only take a couple of hours flying time. This will be a tremendous asset to those working among this isolated and nomadic people group.

The Samburu THP team returned to the States with thankful hearts for all they saw accomplished during their time in Kenya. Thank you to the many people whose contributions made this trip possible and to the five guys who made up the team.

Help, Hope, Heal in Ecuador ’17

Help, Hope, Heal in Ecuador ’17

One of the main reasons The Hanna Project traveled to Ecuador was to provide medical care for remote villages in the area of Misahualli. The first day we went to Tres Hermanos. (see map in pictures above) During a steady rain, the group trudged through the mud to provide medical care for families in the rural jungle village. The medial team, made up of two doctors, a nurse, an x-ray technician, a paramedic and four nursing students, provided some basic health care to children and their parents.

The highlight of the day was visiting the village school and checking the students for various medical conditions. There were so many smiling, sweet faces of the children and some really thankful parents. We felt very blessed to be there and hope we provided some needed medical care. Dr. Ari was given permission to share the “Wordless Book” with the students in the class. It was so inspiring to watch her interact with the children and to pray with them.

If you donated wound care kits to The Hanna Project, we left several of them with the people in the villages. Along with the wound kits, we also received a lot of other donated medical supplies. The supplies are being used in the villages and given to the larger regional clinic in Misahualli. The medical team visited three other villages throughout the week, ministering to the medical and social needs of the indigenous people who live in the area.

The medical team saw more than 650 patients in four villages over the course of four days. The needs were great and the team did their best to help local health officials complete “well child” checks, provide vitamins for children and adults and treat minor ailments of people living in the villages.

Angela E. contributor

Construction in Cote d’Ivoire ’17

Construction in Cote d’Ivoire ’17

The construction team for The Hanna Project worked side-by-side with the Ivorian workers in the grueling heat of northern Ivory Coast in early April.  With big plans, and lots of hands, the major construction projects were completed.

New tiles, doors, window glass and screens, new paint, and lights transformed an unlivable space into a welcome sight for a Cuban doctor and her family arriving soon to work at the hospital in Doropo. A “VIP” room and outside windows in the hospital also received much needed attention. The hospital director and president of the Ivorian NGO Beraca were overflowing with compliments and gratitude.
THANK YOU team members, family members, and contributors who gave of your time, talents and treasures to make THP Cote d’Ivoire 2017 possible!

Ivory Coast Medical ’17

Ivory Coast Medical ’17

The Hanna Project 2017 Ivory Coast team, returned to the USA on April 6. Chris, Curt, Clint, Eddie, Elizabeth, Drew, Jacob, Joan, Lynette, Michaelanne, Sam, Shane, and Sherwood each have their own stories to tell. But the Ivorian stories need to be told too.
The Ivorian Dr. who completed 16 surgeries, many other procedures and an emergency C-section of a baby girl, could not stop talking about our THP nurses! They were thanked for their cooperative spirit, mutual respect when teaching, learning and observing, plus their countless donations of scrubs and other medical supplies were appreciated.  More than 100+ consultations and medical needs were met by the Ivory staff and THP nurses.
Over 150 Ivorian families, in a secluded village, received Help, Hope, and Healing on our last day in Doropo. Wound care stations, consultations, written prescriptions, and Wound Care Kits where shared by our Ivorian and THP nurses. The smiles and thanks were unforgettable!

The Wreck

The Wreck

The nap was needed after long, hot, sleepless nights the previous week. But the pleasant nap ended with a start, as our bus stopped. I don’t know if it was the stopping of the bus or the ceasing of the African air conditioner, (the windows down and 85 mile per hour speeds), which ended the nap!  Nevertheless, our Ivorian doctor and bus driver rushed back to the scene of the accident. Bodies were strewn all over the two-lane highway between the towns of Bondoukou and Bouna. Our nurses quickly rushed to the scene as well, along with other THP team members. Of course, it was the end of our trip, so all of our medical supplies were left behind at the hospital for urgent needs in Doropo.

Our limited French speaking skills were a hindrance to provide the kind of help each of the team members wanted to give. The injured lay along the highway. Those who perished were covered with a cloth and others were pulled from the wreckage. A baby did survive, but her mother did not. And even though we knew the injured were not speaking English the wailing from these Ivorians sounded like the word “why?”. A variety of tribes could have been represented, so we knew they didn’t speak English. But the wailing and the crying sounded like “why?”. For the remainder of our trip we were reminded once again of “the why?”. Why do team members give of their time, their talent, and their financial treasure to be part of The Hanna Project?

This tragic scene in the middle of the Ivory Coast was just a microcosm of our world. As the injured, the confused, and the awestruck cried out and asked for water, they lifted up their hands for help.  Our team was again reminded of our world’s tremendous needs, it is filled with those who need Help, Hope, and Healing, which we as The Hanna Project get to share!

Container for Ecuador

Container for Ecuador

Workers will have better equipped houses!  Teachers will have cooler classrooms!  Groundskeepers will not be “mowing” five acres of jungle with weed eaters anymore! Students will have new playground equipment!  Why are all of these things possible?  Because The Hanna Project and their supporters sent a container filled with these materials and so much more.  Antioch Christian Academy is another place where The Hanna Project is able to bring Help, Hope, and Healing to those who need it most!

N.I.C.E.

N.I.C.E.

Nashville – The Hanna Project partnered with Women Active for Christ and donated a truck/room full of items for refugee placement in Nashville.  The Welch Lady Flames basketball team helped load and unload the much needed household items.

Nashville International Center for Empowerment (N.I.C.E.) states their goal as: “Empowering refugees and immigrants, providing vibrant leadership, building strong community relationships, providing sustainable service programs, creating a respectful resource center, and developing robust networking partnerships in Middle Tennessee and across the country.”

Even when THP is not working in international locations, we are working with internationals!  See the video here.